People with Disabilities

“In a survey of employers last year, 78 percent said they believed people with disabilities were discriminated against in employment,” explains David Matthews, CCS Disability Action Chief Executive.

According to the CCS Disability Action in New Zealand, there is clear evidence of discrimination against people with disabilities when it comes to access to employment. Both the United Kingdom and the United States collect quarterly data on the unemployment rate amongst people with disabilities but New Zealand does not. However, the evidence is still clear.

“People with disabilities are overrepresented on benefits and in unemployment. In 2011, 35 percent of people on a main benefit claimed a disability allowance. Only 45 percent of people with disabilities were in the labor force compared to 77 percent of people without disabilities,” said Matthews. He went on to say that they would not know if they were actually addressing the issue without accurate data. Read more about how New Zealanders with Disabilities Face Employment Discrimination.

Krystal Tomlinson, who was recently crowned Miss Jamaica Festival Queen 2013, wants to change the attitudes of students toward persons with disabilities. She would like to start inside schools where she sees students with disabilities experiencing discrimination and exclusion from social activities.

“I hope to create a space that builds tolerance among young people in schools,” said the 2013 Festival Queen, “especially primary schools, to better treat their counterparts with disabilities.”

She explained further that the project will include a conference, training workshop and competition. Read more about how the newly crowned Miss Jamaica is advocating for people with disabilities.

“Be more like us,” says Secretary of State John Kerry describing the message delivered by The Disabilities Treaty. The Treaty is intended to open the world to Americans with disabilities. Ratification will help provided Americans with the same protection globally that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) provides them on US soil. Moreover, it will enable Americans with disabilities to participate fully in the global economy. Read more about the The Disabilities Treaty.

Your Guide to Understanding the Canadian Human Rights Act,” is a new video that includes both American Sign Language (ASL) and Quebec Sign Language (LSQ) as well as English and French captioning. People with low literacy or vision disabilities will benefit from the audio track, which is in both English and French. The project to create this accessible video was led by Jim Roots, the Executive Director of the Canadian Association of the Deaf, who collaborated with the Canadian Human Rights Commission (CHRC) on the production.

In research conducted by the University of Kansas, preschoolers with autism will use an iPad voice output app with their classmates. This will help determine whether the technology can improve deficits in communication, social reciprocity and play skills typical for children on the autism spectrum. Read more about the app for autism.

On July 31st at 2pm the Federal Trade Commission will host a free webinar informing blind and low vision consumers on protect themselves from identity theft. People who wish to participate can join the webinar 15 minutes prior to the event. You are strongly encouraged to test your computer prior to the event.

A group of students with vision disabilities, participating in a summer enrichment program at the Carroll Center for the Blind, have been testing the Visus Visual Assist System by the Boston based Visus Technology. The Visus Visual Assist System is a wireless mobile system that takes advantage of the 4G LTE network and allows people who are blind and low vision to recognize faces, determine colors, and navigate their travel. It is expected to be ready for public use soon. Read more about students at Carroll Center for the Blind testing revolutionary technology.

Wireless CapTel by Sprint powered by Raketu is now available for all iOS powered devices. Wireless CapTel by Sprint gives real-time word-for-word captions of phone conversations. Now persons with hearing disabilities can read captions of conversations on the phone’s display when the call is connected to the CapTel service. Watch the YouTube Wireless CapTel video here.

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