People with Disabilities

It’s illegal for taxi drivers to choose whom to transport, but that doesn’t stop them from avoiding picking up people with disabilities. Some cities offer subsidized trips for those with disabilities, but they require advance booking and take longer than a direct trip because of multiple passengers. Even ride-sharing services have had their share of growing pains, with lack of wheelchair accessible vehicles markedly increasing wait times.

In an effort to combat these concerns, Uber has rolled out a pilot partnership with MV Transportation called UberWAV that promises to make it easier (and as cost-efficient as UberX) for people with disabilities to hail an Uber. MV Transportation will provide the wheelchair accessible vehicles and Uber will connect drivers with passengers. The pilot program will be rolled out in Washington, DC, New York City, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, and Toronto.

“It is very costly, but we recognize this is a thing where we can demonstrably transform the way that people have historically thought about transportation, a population of people for whom there have been huge barriers,” said Malcom Glenn, Uber’s head of global policy, accessibility and underserved communities.

Seeing Eye has been training guide dogs for almost 100 years. (Fun trivia: they patented the term “seeing-eye dog.”) The four months of intense training they employ with the dogs concludes with an trip to New York City as the penultimate test to prove the dog can safely guide a blind person. A trainer and the dog’s new master accompany the dog through busy streets and public transportation as the trainer assesses how well the dog navigates the various challenges. “There’s no more intense place than New York City to train the dogs — it’s the craziest environment they’ve ever been in,” said Brian O’Neal, a Seeing Eye trainer.

Seeing Eye is not the only guide dog training school that uses New York City as the ultimate obstacle course; Guiding Eyes For the Blind and the Guide Dog Foundation also use the frenetic city as a training ground.   Marion Gwizdala, president of the National Association of Guide Dog Users, applauds these efforts, noting that even if the dogs aren’t going to be living in a city urban training prepares them for crowded public areas like malls and carnivals.

Seeing Eye has been training guide dogs for almost 100 years. (Fun trivia: they patented the term “seeing-eye dog.”) The four months of intense training they employ with the dogs concludes with an trip to New York City as the penultimate test to prove the dog can safely guide a blind person. A trainer and the dog’s new master accompany the dog through busy streets and public transportation as the trainer assesses how well the dog navigates the various challenges. “There’s no more intense place than New York City to train the dogs — it’s the craziest environment they’ve ever been in,” said Brian O’Neal, a Seeing Eye trainer.

Seeing Eye is not the only guide dog training school that uses New York City as the ultimate obstacle course; Guiding Eyes For the Blind and the Guide Dog Foundation also use the frenetic city as a training ground.   Marion Gwizdala, president of the National Association of Guide Dog Users, applauds these efforts, noting that even if the dogs aren’t going to be living in a city urban training prepares them for crowded public areas like malls and carnivals.

logo

In this episode:

Mark introduces two new podcast hosts (Todd Waites and Derek Bove) and one producer (Marissa Sapega) from Interactive Accessibility’s parent company, The Paciello Group. Todd discusses his experience living with only one arm but explains why he has never considered it a disability. All three talk about how they got into the field of accessibility, which leads to a discussion on National Disability Employment Awareness Month.

Unless their eyes are closed and covered with soap, most sighted people rarely mistake the shampoo bottle for the conditioner or vice versa. Unfortunately, this is an everyday annoyance for visually impaired people, as shampoo and conditioner bottles generally lack differentiating physical characteristics.

Recently, however, P&G’s obsession with their customers led them into inclusive design territory: they decided to add vertical lines on the bottom of Herbal Essences’ shampoo bottles and circles to the bottom of the conditioner bottles to eliminate confusion for their visually impaired customers.

While medicinal product packaging must have Braille in Europe, no such regulation exists in the United States. Advocates and people with disabilities hope P&G’s initiative will spark a chang in mindset among other consumer packaged goods companies.

On September 18 Orioles and Blue Jays fans were treated to a special display: the Baltimore baseball team sported jerseys with Braille spelling out their team and letter names. Fans also received Braille alphabet cards and listened to blind pianist Carlos Ibay sing the national anthem. The Orioles’ show of support was to honor the 40th anniversary of the National Federation of the Blind moving their headquarters to Baltimore. The jerseys will subsequently be auctioned off, with proceeds going to the NFB.

A new machine being rolled out in Florida voting facilities this fall promises an inclusive voting experience for all users, regardless of their physical abilities. Known as ExpressVote, this machine boasts multiple capabilities that cater to all manner of physical disabilities. A touch screen allows users to enlarge, darken, and lighten the screen to suit their particular needs. For voters who rely on audio, ExpressVote offers the option to listen to ballot choices through headphones and verbally choose a selection. It even has Braille. Once the vote is confirmed, it is printed and tabulated along with the rest of the votes. While many voters with disabilities choose to mail in their votes, ExpressVote provides one more way that they can experience the world just like everyone else.

Ahmet Ustunel inspired the world when he made the solo trip from Asia to Europe without being able to see a thing. Aided by a GPS that beeps to warn him if he steers off course and a Victor Stream Reader, he dodged shipping vessels and navigated choppy waves to successfully cross the 3-mile strait. His courageous expedition was funded by his winnings from the Holman Prize, a Lighthouse initiative intended to support exceptional endeavors of “blind ambition.” 

New research from the CDC shows that one in four US adults have a disability that impacts their daily activities. The most common one is mobility disability, which disproportionately affects older adults ages 65 and above at a rate of 40%. The research also reveals an inverse relationship between income and disability, especially mobility. According to the CDC, “mobility disability is nearly five times as common among middle-aged (45- to 64-year old) adults living below the poverty level compared to those whose income is twice the poverty level.” The study also reported that those with vision disabilities were the least likely to have access to medical care.

logo "The IAP Your Accessibility Podcast"

In this episode:

The Interactive Accessibility Podcast (IAP) is an entertaining approach to accessibility. We enjoy sharing our discussions on accessibility and how it relates to technology, real-life issues, information, businesses, and people with disabilities.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - People with Disabilities