IAP Podcasts

In this episode:

Mark Miller, host of the IAP, and Todd Waites, head of Business Development at TPG, chat with Sha Yao, the entrepreneur behind the assistive tableware products, EatWell. Sha’s inspiration came from her grandmother, who had Alzheimer’s, and the trouble she encountered when trying to feed herself. Sha, Mark , and Todd all discuss her background as an industrial designer and the research she conducted herself to create her products, as well as her vision for the future of her company.

In this episode:

The host, Mark Miller, producer Marissa Sapega, and TPG Director of Marketing Brad Henry all chat with their coworker Rebecca Bridges. Rebecca and her husband are blind, and she shares the difficulties of being quarantined and frustration at not being able to help her son with schoolwork because it is inaccessible. She discloses her thoughts on disability etiquette (make sure I know you’re there if you want me to social distance!) and how to navigate a public bathroom without the help of sight.

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In this episode:

Mark Miller, the host, and Marissa Sapega, podcast producer, speak with Tony DePalma about the many ways COVID-19 has significantly impacted people with disabilities. From getting basic necessities like food to accessing student online education, the ways in which the pandemic has negatively affected this community are almost endless. Tony surfaces anecdotes from his own experience as Director of Public Policy for Disability Rights Florida and the three discuss the potential long-term outcomes of this global disaster – not all of which are bad.

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In this episode:

Victor regales the host, Mark Miller, with vignettes on how he and his team work to accommodate the almost one million people with disabilities living in New York City in all boroughs, as well as the thousands of tourists with disabilities who visit each year. They discuss the unique challenges of each borough when it comes to accommodating PWDs, and specific examples of has been implemented in Times Square, Brooklyn Bridge Park, and other areas of the city to make it more accessible.

With no reliable and easy way to identify if a child has autism, doctors usually rely on a battery of tests. However, one company, Quadrant, just released what they claim is a reliable saliva test to determine the presence of autism. The saliva is analyzed by Quadrant in a fraction of the time it usually takes to diagnose autism, which averages around 17 months. CEO Richar Uhlig is optimistic about the test, stating "We've committed that our test results could be made available to the ordering clinician within three to six weeks so we think that will add significant evidence to the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder.’’

logo the IAP your Accessibility Podcast

In this episode:

Mark chats with Kevan Chandler, a non-profit founder, author, and adventurer to the core. They talk about Kevan’s non-profit, We Carry Kevan, which strives to encourage the dignity of individuals with disabilities and their support systems, acknowledging everyone’s unique potential. Kevan discusses his travels as “the human backpack” with his friends across Europe and China, and goes into detail about his books and what inspires him. He also discloses who he would be if he were a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle.

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In this episode:

Joe Devon, co-founder of GAAD, joins Mark for his second appearance on the Interactive Accessibility podcast to discuss the history of Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD) and how the landscape of accessibility has changed since GAAD’s inception, over eight years ago. They talk about how getting to the end user and having the end user demand accessibility will be the real the catalyst for significant change in the industry. Joe explains how he’s using his GAAD pledge to rally the developer community around accessibility.

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